GI’s on the Pheasey estate

Your memories of GI’s on the Pheasey estate and around Kingstanding.

Part of the housing estate was requisitioned by British forces and in 1942 and American soldiers were placed in the estate. One of the occupying units was the 10th Replacement depot. The Replacement Depot was a staging post sending soldiers coming over from the U.S. to replace American wounded/killed soldiers on the front. It was a satellite station to Whittington Barracks in Lichfield.

10th Replacement depot Pheasey Estate Orderly Room. Courtesy of Fran and Martin Collins

Memories

10th Replacement Depot. Pheasey Estate Control Point. Courtesy of Fran and Martin Collins

Memories

MP on guard duty. 10th Replacement Depot. Pheasey Estate during World War 2. Courtesy of Fran and Martin Colins

For more information on the Pheasey Estate during World War 2, there is an excellent book :

Fran and Martin Collins, They Who Also Serve Who Stand and Wait. Brewin Books ISBN 185858204-0

Advertisements

Responses

  1. I remember the US military at the Pheasey Estate very well. The entrance in to the camp was on the right side of The Trees pub. One night after visitng an aunt with my mom and dad and waitng for the bus (No 29) my father offered the Ur guard five shilling for wicker broom, he accepted it.

    Also, I can re-call seeing US military personnel around the general neighbourhood and as kids we would ask them ‘got any gum chum’

    Down on the Kingstanding Circle area drunken GIs would be thrown in the back of military trucks and taken back to the Pheasey base by the MPs.

    When the US military finally left their Pheasey base they left behind the houses completely wrecked and trashed. The entrance in to the base is now Romney Way. A complete military base existed behind the Trees public house.

    You would see plenty US uniformed personell around the Great Barr and Kingstanding area all with plenty of money to spend and dating the local girls. They would walk arm in arm with the girls showing them lots of attention. I know lots more.

    • Hi John,

      I’m making a history series for BBC2, and am interested in more information about Pheasy Farm Estate – is there anything still there left over from the americans time there etc? Please let me know – will.fegen@bbc.co.uk.

      Will

      • Hi Will

        Generally, the layout of the Pheasy Estate is still in tact as it was in the 1940s. But you need to consentrate on the area of the Trees Pub, Queslett Road. To the right and behind the Trees was the US base itself. US Military personnel would have been seen all over the Great Barr and Kingstanding area during the period WW2 period.

        Kind regards,
        John

  2. My aunt, Barbara Connor, married a GI, Salvatore Taranto, who was stationed on the Pheasey Estate. He was a cook. They married on 27th May 1945 at Christ the King Catholic Church, and on 21st February, 1946, aged 19, she sailed to New York on the liner ‘Queen Mary’ to join her new husband. It must have been an exciting voyage, but frightening too, to leave family and friends for an unknown future. I think they were very brave. They had a happy marriage, and although my uncle is now dead, my aunt is still alive, and we talk often on the telephone.

    • My grandfather was american, he was also a cook on the pheasey estate, my father was adopted and we know nothing of my grandfathers family, we know his name was terence or tex any help would be amazing x

  3. I remember the GI’s they used to go to dances at the church Hall at the bottom of Birdbrook Rd I think it was called St. Mathews and GI’s used to call the Drakes Drum Public House 1p on the Drum

  4. I can only remember my mother and nan telling me that they would hear a shot and then the words ‘Halt who goes there,friend or foe’ they lived oposite the estate at 905,Queslett road

  5. I remember the G.I’s sitting on the walls out side the Hare and Hounds on a weekend .we used to fetch them fish and chips from the Welcome fish and chip shop.they always had plenty of money and used to order one shillings worth of chips (we used to have 3 penneth of chips ) .I also remember them riding push bikes around the Circle as they always seem to ride with their knees sticking out as they were much taller then the average brit.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: